Rattlebrained

musical washboards, rhythm bones, t-shirt designs, Swamp Train & the blues...

Articles have been tagged as art

Zimoun «Sculpting Sound» Solo Exhibition: Ringling Museum of Art

23 March 2012, 14:00

Zimoun is cool! I like the ones that sound like rain the best…

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Videos

Comment

Art, Jazz & The Blues

30 August 2011, 10:01

the fanfare du loup at the Auvernier Jazz festival August has passed in a flash as it will when you’re having fun ;-)…

First I spent a couple of weeks helping friend Bill prepare some of his cool home made instruments for his first art show! This event will take place in Fribourg at the Atelier-Galerie J.-J. Hofstetter on September 9th at 8pm. He has programed a series of concerts with them (the instruments) and various other musicians so check out the schedule if you happen to be near by.

Bill, as it has already been mentioned here and there in this blog, also plays with the Fanfare du Loup Orchestra, a Geneva based Big Band. They where just down the mountain last Sunday at the Auvernier Jazz Festival where they played a selection of tunes from their Play it again, Bill program. The sketch is from that event.

Eric Bibb ended what was really a great day, the festival is situated on the west shore of the lake of Neuchâtel and the storm that came through this area Friday evening had left the air sharp and clean. Sunday was warm and sunny, the view of the alps magnificent, superb sound (I salute the festival’s sound engineers!), perfect to just hang out and enjoy it all.

Otherwise besides a few days with the folks and the Swamp Train Gorgier beach gig (previous post), I’ve been reorganizing my workshop space with hope to gain some storage space, the prolific artist’s plight… Have begun building my first cigar box guitar (more on that soon) and been practicing a lot on the drum set since I absolutely need to improve my stick control. Swamp Train is among the 4 bands selected for the finals of the 1st Swiss blues challenge !

Rattlebrained

Musings, Drawing

Comment

Stamps For Your Halloween Greeting Cards

8 October 2010, 16:16

This year I designed some stamps for Halloween greeting cards and party invitations, here are the two I like the best:



The bottom one has a zombie walking skeleton wearing headphones which I find pretty funny but I have to admit that there are some really cool Halloween postage designed by other artists too so the competition is chilling!

;-)

Rattlebrained

,

Comment

Show @ The Annamarie Andersen Galery

9 August 2010, 22:10

invitation to the exhibitionAnnamarie Andersen has proposed to show a selection of my bronze and other objects from the past in a show with Italian artist and friend Graziano Marini.

It opens August 26th: vernissage from 17h00 to 20h00 – and runs to October 15th with the a finissage from 17h00 to 20h00.

So if you’re interested in my stuff from back then, it will be a good occasion to see a few pieces!

Rattlebrained

,

Comment

Wow! Three Rattlebrained 2010 Yearly Calendars!

30 October 2009, 09:17

Lost Souls & Stink Bugs Wall Calendar 2010
Be the first on the block with a unique Rattlebrained wall calender for next Year!

Lost Souls & Stink Bugs A Yearly Calendar for 2010 contains 12 kind of weird, kind of wow! works of art, created by yours truly between the Fall of 2007 and Summer ’08)!

Icons, Lines, Demons & Death Wall Calendar 2010
Icons, Lines, Demons & Death A Yearly Calendar for 2010 has 12 original masterpieces painstakingly selected from works dating between 2005 and early 2007!

And the all new Ducky Demons & Greed Indeed Wall Calendar 2010, filled with 12 never seen before “add many superlatives here” artworks from ’07, ’08 and even 2009! Ducky Demons & Greed Indeed Wall Calendar 2010

All three contain my weird, funny, depressing and guaranteed to make you wonder artwork, plus small rectangular spaces to write things for all the days of the year!

Check’em out and browse through the pictures….
Then buy at your own risk!
(I have not received my copy of the the new “Ducky Demons…” yet so if that’s the calendar of your choice you may want to wait a couple of weeks so that I can make changes, if any are needed. However “Lost Souls…” and “Icons, Lines…” are ready to go!)

And of course they make great unique Christmas gifts for your loved ones!!

Rattlebrained

,

Comment

Demonstrating Water With Stones Revisited

30 June 2008, 12:59

So I happen to look at my YouTube statistics yesterday and was more than surprised to see that my Demonstrating Water With Stones video documentation has gone from around 350 visitors to nearly 2000 in the last few weeks. Who knows from where or why and it’s all the weirder since the few who rated, rated poorly indeed….

Maybe that’s why? ;-)

In any case there was a freshly inscribed comment: How was water demonstrated by stones?

A tad cheeky, but an interesting question nevertheless, perhaps? I’m still feeling mixed about it, and am hesitating to answer in a more explanatory manner. It shows a somewhat blunt first degree view of things; which I recognize as something I tend to do as well and am not all that pleased when it happens. Yet it’s a fact that one is not always as available as one would need to be to have an opened perspective all the time.

And it’s also a fact that in this installation the title came first and for that reason the work itself is twice removed from it; so questioning the link between the title and the installation is legitimate. But it has been a couple of years and my mind’s somewhere else now, so for the moment I’ll wait and see if any more comments develop on there own.
—————————————

Update July 7th: Turns out there were over 1500 views between June 27 and 29 and that they all came from folks watching Prof. Splash Jump into 12 inches of water from 35 feet tower! I can understand their disappointment on stumbling on my slow and boring documentation. ;-)

Rattlebrained

,

Comment

Sports, art and politics?

8 April 2008, 21:11

Apparently today was the opening of the Ferdinand Hodler exhibition at the Kunstmuseum in Bern. This made the news because among the people who lent their paintings to the museum was Switzerland’s extreme right populist party mentor: Christoph Blocher. It so happens that his party, the “Swiss People’s Party” is more than pissed that the afore mention (sorry, no name calling here) was pretty much kicked out of the government by the parliament last fall and have decided to basely revenge themselves on the person that replaced him in office.

Bern’s mayor refused to go to the opening – apparently Mr. Blocher asked to be named, my translation: kicked out Federal Councillor (abgew Bundesrat) on the invitation – there were left wing anti-Blocher political banners in front of the museum….

Considering the numerous reactions that the Olympic flame is raising, like the Olympic Torch Flame being extinguished yesterday in Paris, one has a hard time not questioning a certain ongoing naive opinion that sports, like art, should not be mixed with politics. It is obviously not something you can decide about anymore, not that you aren’t entitled to your opinions, but saying that sports and art have nothing to do with politics is just one more way of turning a blind eye.

Don’t misunderstand me however, I am not saying this is a good thing, because sometimes it isn’t and yet sometimes it is, and sometimes it take years to know which it was. I believe it is an unavoidable fact however and as such has to be guesstimated. Which to me means at least kept in sight, something the Olympic federation seems to have forgotten.

Rattlebrained

,

Comment

Mona Lisa talks... Cows running in painting!

3 April 2008, 20:19

Painting has been declared dead many times and by many different people, but usually the story is that some “new” art movement has made painting obsolete. I don’t think painting has really been threatened by other forms of art, ever, but perhaps the threat comes from elsewhere…

How are painters to compete with #17: Cows running in painting!

play music with high tension content here :-)

From Reuters:

INTRO: South Korea unveils its hi-tech take on some of the world’s most famous paintings.

TV AND WEB RESTRICTIONS~**NONE**~

South Korea’s Alive-Gallery unveils its IT-connected world famous paintings, whose characters are moving and talking.

……………………..
I’ve tried to find a link to the Alive Gallery but so far unsuccessfully…
……………………..

SHOWS:
(ASIA) SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA (RECENT) (REUTERSACCESS ALL)
1. CHILDREN RAISING THEIR HANDS AND SAYINGHELLO” TO A VERSION
OF THE MONA LISA AND THE MONA LISA RESPONDING
2. BOY AND GIRL IMITATING THE MONA LISA’S GESTURES
3. MONA LISA MOVING IN PAINTING
4. CHILDREN WATCHING
5. CHILDREN ASKING QUESTION: “WHY YOU DON’T HAVE EYEBROWS?”
6. (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) MONA LISA IN PAINTING SAYING: “During the Renaissance period, when I was living, wide foreheads were regarded as an element of beauty in women. So many women shaved their eyebrows to make their foreheads seem wider.”
7. CHILDREN WATCHINGTHE LAST SUPPER
8. JESUS IN “THE LAST SUPPERTALKING
9. DISCIPLES OF JESUS IN “THE LAST SUPPERMOVING
10. CHARACTERS MOVING IN “THE LAST SUPPER
11. KINDERGARTEN TEACHER TAKING PICTURE OF CHILDREN
12. (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) 36-YEAR-OLD KINDERGARTEN TEACHER, JUNG HYUN-HEE,
SAYING: “Children used to get tired of watching paintings with boring explanations. Now they are having so much fun here because they can actually
interact with the paintings. It’s very different from other museums.”
13. PEOPLE WATCHINGTHE ARNOLFINI MARRIAGE
14. CHARACTERS MOVING IN “THE ARNOLFINI MARRIAGE
15. PEOPLE WATCHINGTHE EVENING BELL
16. CHILDREN ENTERING THROUGH GATE
17. COWS RUNNING IN PAINTING
18. (SOUNDBITE) (Korean) KIM HYUN-JUNG, PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER AT
ALIVE-GALLERY, SAYING: “This living gallery has a different concept of display from others. It applies the domestic information technology to the masterpieces so that those characters of the paintings can move vigorously, which is the world’s first case.”
19. DIGITALIZED MICHELANGELO BUONARROTI WORKING ON HISTHE LAST
JUDGMENTAND SAYINGWHO IS CALLING THIS MICHELANGELO?”
20. PEOPLE WATCHING
21. DIGITALIZED MICHELANGELO EXPLAINING HOW HE CREATEDTHE LAST
JUDGMENT
22. PEOPLE WATCHING

STORY: Do you want to know why Mona Lisa doesn’t have any eyebrows? If you
visit this “Living Gallery” in South Korea, you can get the answer
from Mona Lisa herself, not from a curator. A South Korean gallery has unveiled its “living paintings”,
whose characters are moving and talking, thanks to recent Information
Technology (IT). IT has infused life into 62 masterpieces such as the “Mona
Lisa”, “The Last Supper” and “The Arnolfini
Marriage”. Little children, who struggle to appreciate the value of art, can now
understand those masterpieces in a fun and easy way by interacting with the
characters in the paintings. Ask by young visitors at the gallery why she didn’t have any eyebrows,
a digitalized version of the Mona Lisa responded: “During the Renaissance
period, when I was living, wide foreheads were regarded as an element of
beauty in women. So many women shaved their eyebrows to make their foreheads
seem wider”. One kindergarten teacher who brought her little students to the gallery
said this new technology made it easy for children to concentrate on the
paintings. “Children used to get tired of watching paintings with boring
explanations. Now they are having so much fun here because they can actually
interact with the paintings. It’s very different from other museums,”
said 36-year-old kindergarten teacher Jung Hyun-hee. Gallery officials say this is the world’s first gallery to use this IT
concept and they are planning to export the technology to other countries.

“This living gallery has a different concept of display from others. It applies the domestic information technology to the masterpieces so that those characters of the paintings can move vigorously, which is the world’s first case,” said Kim Hyun-jung at “Living Gallery”. The gallery which opened in the Jamshil area of Seoul in March hopes to cast a new light on old art, inspiring the country’s young.
Rattlebrained

,

Comment

As the suspense thickens...

25 July 2007, 21:36

carrotsThe windows in my apartment where changed today from 125 year old wooden things that we barely dare to touch anymore because they where falling apart in every way possible, to white plastic double glass panes that hopefully will do a better job at keeping out the cold. Ugly but efficient as opposed to rotten with a history I guess.

However when I look at the silicone they have put around the edges, between the crumbling old damp stone and the plastic, I do not see 100 years of faithful service. But that is not my problem so why be bothered, back to pealing carrots and potatoes, a pleasant task, lets your mind wander.

Gluing little squares of paper onto a piece of canvas is like that too. And while doing just that today, I ended up considering how often you can be turned on to a work of art, literature or the likes by another person, friend or not, although it helps. And this made me consider how and why our perception of art is being modified by today culture of the masses. An old story of course, and yet always new if you want to be romantic about it.
Although it seems that we have relatively rapidly (200 odd years? that’s fast enough for me…) gone from a situation where art was imposed by the ruling powers, often a church, to an elitist consumer hype oriented market. It seems to me that the real culprit for the lack of brilliancy found in todays art is mostly due to technology. I know, I hear you laugh, perhaps rightly. After all, isn’t technology, progress, globalisation, etc, a convenient scapegoat for many things? I was, however thinking of a byproduct of it: reference.

To put it simply, before photography you had to rely on memory, sketches, an occasional copy and written descriptions to keep an art work “with you”. Now you open a book or search the web.
Before recordings, the only way to hear music was to have someone play it. Now we are neck deep in reference recordings, often superb; unforgettable!

Yet forget we must to truly assimilate and go beyond.

Rattlebrained

Musings,

Comment

Either you like it or you don't

20 July 2007, 21:29

One of the more arresting things about being an artist is surviving the way people consider it as an activity. What other occupation gets you “and do you live from it?” as a sequel to “what do you do?”. OK, sometimes you get the “what type of art” question in between but either way: say no and your inquisitor usually beams with righteous justice, say yes and visibly you’ve sold out.

Yes, yes, that’s a bit of an stereotyped exaggeration but it was fun to write and has a ring of truth…

In any case in the real world, as opposed to the art world, it almost always makes people project all their images of flakiness, weirdness and irrationality on you. Which is kind of funny since generally artists are just like you and me, often pretty narrow minded, believing in the truth of what they believe, not much fantasy, lots of wishful thinking… But anyway, that’s not what I wanted to write about.

Either you like it or you don’t, in art everyone is an expert. It’s rare that someone considers that the many hours spent working (yes, making art=work) can actually help you become a better artist and make better work. You can’t prove it, there is no diploma, a work of art is not like a bridge or a building or a mathematical formula.
Art doesn’t even need to do anything or make sense, it just is, and don’t you wish that was true? Because it isn’t – and yet that can depend on how you perceive it.

Rattlebrained

Art, Musings

Comment

SHOWDOWN

16 July 2007, 21:28

Earlier this evening I joined Bill and Dave for a beer at the P’tit Paris since it was perfect weather to sit outside and enjoy it. I mention this for two reasons: each summer the P’tit Paris invites bands to sign up and play for them end of July and early August, something we have done a few times. However this year for a bunch of reasons we will not be able to play then and the cafe’s boss was disappointed when he heard that so he asked when we could.

All that to say that we will be playing next (this coming July 18th) Wednesday so if you happen to be nearby…

I then came home, check the mail and receive the latest news from Saatchi Gallery: “All visitors are invited to start voting on the two finalists in the head-to-head, and all artists are now able to submit their artwork to enter the next SHOWDOWN”.
Dear reader, let this be a lesson on the harm of alcohol consumption, having nothing better to do I quickly entered one of my works into this amusement. So if you care to, I invite you to go vote for, or against, me here: showdown. (VOTING STARTS 23-07-2007 9 AM GMT)

In any case this will have permitted one thing: I got to blog about our blues band: Messin’ Round Organic Blues Unit and my art together in one post ;-)

Rattlebrained

Art, Messin' Round

Comment

EEOOY::How-to-make contemporary installation art::Ep.1 Part2

29 May 2007, 21:46

So here is part 2 of episode one of Each & Every One of You (EEOOY), hope you enjoy it as much as I have!

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Videos

Comment

Zap through concepts

12 May 2007, 21:12

Zap through conceptsIsn’t contemporary art great! So much better than all those dusty old paintings that took hours to look at because there was just too much to digest. Now you can go look at an exhibition, pop through it in no time whatsoever, be delighted with it all and go on to the next one. It’s the greatest thing, and whats more you don’t need to worry about being smart or educated enough to understand anything. The zap through concepts that many hot young artists are chugging out these days are shrewdly calculated to nudge you exactly where it’s needed to trigger that automated response! You are putty in their expert hands so enter freely and cast all your foolish worries aside!

And it’s perfect since there just isn’t enough time in today’s society for over complicated art anyway, simply too many other fun things to do.

Its made me think that the time has come to cough up a word for these new masters of communication. After all the word “art” stinks of old fashion highbrow mothballs and doesn’t mean much anymore.

Any ideas anyone?

Rattlebrained

Art, Musings

Comment [3]

PoMo Creolization

6 April 2007, 22:46

… Shirky describes this generational shift in terms of pidgin versus Creole. “Do you know that distinction? Pidgin is what gets spoken when people patch things together from different languages, so it serves well enough to communicate. But Creole is what the children speak, the children of pidgin speakers. They impose rules and structure, which makes the Creole language completely coherent and expressive, on par with any language. What we are witnessing is the Creolization of media.” …

The above quote is from: Kids, the Internet, and the End of Privacy: The Greatest Generation Gap Since Rock and Roll -- New York Magazine", an interesting article by Emily Nussbaum

I can’t help but wonder to what extent there is a parallel here with today’s art. Could one argue that art is the Creolization of all former “art” languages, both traditional and not? Does the question make sense? Has it always been? (It could certainly be formulated in a better way).

I guess the fact that there was/is no “official” (art history approved) state of “pidgin art” is what makes it just artsy nonsense, and yet it makes my hair tingle. Usually a sign that there is something to consider nevertheless, even if I’m missing it.
Perhaps the argument should be that PoMo IS a state of “pidgin art” and that one could “wish for” its Creolization.

If you follow that idea and look for a parallel with the “Internet Kids” article then what? Besides feeling old… ;-)

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment

We are all photographers now

28 March 2007, 22:41

Just before going to S.F. the local press was talking about the “tous photographes!” (we are all photographers now) show at Lausanne's Musée de l’Elysée. An exhibition that shows us how digital technology has changed the art of photography and one in which you can participate in as well (maybe) by uploading your images here.

And the New York Times published an article about the exhibition just before I came home, so it followed me enough to take note although I have yet to see the show.

One of the works that has received the most attention by the press is the video by N.Y. based photographer Noah Kalina: “everyday”. A somewhat boring six minute assemblage of 2,356 daily self-portraits shots.

I quote from the NY Times: “But what makes “everyday” truly exceptional is how easy it was to make and how quickly it attracted a huge audience, said William A. Ewing, director of the Musée de l’Elysée, who selected it for the exhibition.”

Taking a picture of yourself for seven years may not be as easy as all that for most of us. Plus, assuming it takes at least a minute to find the camera and take and download the picture of the day, the artist has spent at least 39 hours, or almost two whole days, to create his work.

It could be said that time is the enemy of all but the best of art. Yet ironically(?), time is what most people never seem to have enough of…;-)

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Musings

Comment

Can an idea be too stupid to use for art?

16 March 2007, 22:05

Positively Belcheresque

Yesterdays sharp is today’s dull, or at least it felt like that today. Anyway, it will have to wait. Tomorrow perhaps.

In the mean time you are invited to visit =…Positively Belcheresque= over in Nottingham where more great cartoons, like the one I have “borrowed” here as an appetizer, await you!

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment

Browsing with my feet

15 March 2007, 22:03

San Francisco is such a nice city to wander about in that visiting the gallery scene should be a real pleasure. Which it is of course, although I have to say – old fart me – that I would expect a lot more excitement from a city renown for it’s counter-cultural history. I was told a few times that L.A. is where it is happening, almost could of seemed like sort of a local “what can we do” background color. It’s all attitude down there, they say, don’t give a hoot about N.Y. no reason to be like them, or anyone else, different culture, different savor, do it their own way.

That certainly sounds good, so what’s up here?

I can’t help but think of wine. 20 years ago California wine had a very specific taste, not always great but still, you could taste California in it. Now you get these wines that all seem to be made the same way and although the overall quality is better, the character is disappearing. You would be hard pressed to say whether it was from France, South Africa, CA. or the Czech Republic.

Are generic supermarket products really what we want? Not really all that thrilling but safe, undemanding and easier to sell? To this tourist, many of the cloth designs in shops on Haight street were just as exciting, if not more than, much of the stuff found in the downtown galleries, but perhaps that’s the hitch, downtown. Or maybe it’s just jet-lag and too much sun, whatever, today I’ll wander elsewhere.

Rattlebrained

Art, Musings

Comment

Food for

11 March 2007, 21:44

De Young BurgerMedium rare cheese burger at San Francisco's De Young Museum.

Just the thing to recover after the Vivienne Westwood: 36 Years in Fashion exhibition.

And if you can't make it there, or even if you can, make sure you visit her website.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Pictures

Comment

Smells and mushrooms

5 March 2007, 17:05

Saturdays post has got me thinking about smells and mushrooms which is a special subject since in my first life, I used to work quite a lot with a home made “extract of mushroom” based medium. However Thursday I’m off to the city of my heart and I have a bunch of stuff to do so serious blogging about it will have to wait.

I did this view of the Swiss Alps a long time ago, and it’s far from being very good, however I had it underhand to scan, and it is basically dried mushroom rot, binder and water.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Pictures

Comment

Mushrooms, soy noodles and soap?

3 March 2007, 17:03

In an attempt to avoid putting to much junk down the drain I have gotten into the habit of washing my brushes and stuff in a little water filled pail which, when it gets too disgusting, is poured into an old container or can; whatever is convenient. Depending on the season and the humidity level, either the water evaporates and I can put the residue in the trash bin, or the whole thing starts to rot and stink. Which of course raises the internal, eternal(?) debate of self comfort versus idealism.

A few years ago my “mixture” rotted, dried up, rotted some more, dried up again and really became beautiful both in color and texture. I made a silicon mold ;-) of it with the thought of making a little bronze relief souvenir,.. or something, which I sadly admit, I have yet to do.

All that to not explain my basic happiness at looking at the pictures from we make money not art‘s post about Michel Blaz’s Post Patman installation at the Palais de Tokyo. Hope I can make it there in April!

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing, Musings

Comment

Is process a distance?

22 February 2007, 16:18

I’ve been thinking about the notion of actually moving “forward” in art and the metaphor that keeps appearing in my mind is a carrot on a stick. Which is not to say that I don’t have any carrots, I certainly do and follow them salivating. But in order to be going forward with my artwork, I would need to measure that process as a distance which I have yet to figure out how to do.
So?

a) So is time a motion?
b) So is this passing bit of abstractness a door that opens onto a blank stare or friendly pat on the back (poor thing)?
c) So… (your comment here)

Rattlebrained

Art, Musings

Comment [2]

TG new album

21 February 2007, 16:16

Out of curiosity, I searched the blogosphere for contemporary art which is something that I had never done. It’s a fact that sometimes – often – the obvious escapes me. And yes there it was: Feeling manipulated? asks Newsgrist, sharing with us a few of the names going around at the College Art Association‘s 95th annual conference in Manhattan.

However I was entirely sidetracked by reading that Throbbing Gristle was going to play at Tate Modern in May and London’s Institute of Contemporary Art in June and of the though of a new album: The Endless Not to be released worldwide on April 1st.

Contemporary art must need some Discipline!

Rattlebrained

Music, Art Browsing

Comment

As I fell asleep last night,

17 February 2007, 16:13

I though: To hear music you play a Mp3 file, CD or even better, a LP, and if you want a whole lot better than that; you go to a concert! But it was the fact that music “is” only while it is played that caught my attention, and yet that isn’t true because you can hear it in your head at other moments.

Which led to the following: I’ve always kind of assumed that art works, by their physical status as objects were in a different category of stimulation. Yet there I was in the dark with all these art works in my head. In fact, like many musical pieces that I know only through recordings and will probably never hear live, there are lots of art works that I have only seen in reproductions. Yet I carry them with me and, to be cheesy and romantic about it, they exist in my heart.

Anyway, it seemed more interesting then than this morning.

Rattlebrained

Art, Music

Comment [2]

May I have my autograph please?

16 February 2007, 16:08

A random voyage through the blogosphere landed me on a page that caught my attention due to my having a similar memory of hearing a young child saying, when asking for an autograph; Not your name, mine!

I suspect this happens more often than you’d think, but then who would think about it?

In any case, Paul Schmelzer over at Signifier, signed… was more inspired by his young friend’s impromptu deconstruction of identity than I ever was. Inner laughter, and remembrance. I just wonder if he phrases his question as directly as I have in the title? It’s fun to imagine.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment [2]

Just another post of artsy fartsy gibberish...

15 February 2007, 18:26

My current dilemma is truly accepting the fact that perception is almost pure projection. I believe, because I have experimented on myself (which probably means that I’m mad), that you can teach yourself to be excited by, and appreciate, just about any art work and probably anything else. There always seem to be something that you can focus on that can be used to make yourself “see it”. So I think the way we see is totally malleable and if pushed farther you end up in a space where nothing is anything, good or bad, it just is. Seen globally, today’s art is not far from being there, everything just is, as well as simultaneously becoming just another form of mass entertainment; not that the contemporary art in galleries has much of a mass following but museums yes.

The dilemma is that I do still have my idea of good and bad but recognize its conflict with the afore mentioned state and the uncertainty it brings within that “idea”. Still, at the moment I’m happy to coexist with contradictory feelings although it does make having an opinion sketchy.

Rattlebrained

Art,

Comment

You look good in blue

7 February 2007, 18:22

Mark Staff Brandl has posted an interesting article about artist David Reed over at Sharkforum titled:Is David Reed our Caravaggio, or at least Annibale Carracci?

My gut feeling is “no”, which is not meant to remove credit for this fine artist, but it will take me a few days to figure out why and perhaps elaborate on it.

Meanwhile, hopefully enough snow will fall today for some free heel skiing this weekend.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment [1]

Don't care for the "state of the arts"?

30 January 2007, 18:07

Check out Sharkforum where there have been attacks a plenty on the matter. I can’t say that I agree to them all, and to be frank I’m not sure I’d care to participate in the debate, especially the one about “good painting” versus “bad painting” which rubs me wrong, but it’s important to consider and confront these questions and not just be a zombie.

Plus a hundred years ago in 1907, the art world was boiling with new ideas, questions and excitement and here we are in 2007 facing a world wide art market that has pretty much been taken over by where the money bounces, you know, conformity; be one of the in-crowd.

There are many reasons for this, one IMHO being the simple fact that it has never been so easy to be an artist so artists have propagated beyond reason, becoming a dime a dozen with enough who are simply happy to have a career without much introspective questioning. I’d be the first to agree that possibly – and hopefully – makes for a easier life. But does it make good art? But what is good art anyway? Too easy not to think.

No ones fault, but a growing problem, I know, just one of the too many.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment [2]

Chalk Rules!

21 January 2007, 17:39

3D illusion art by Julian Beever
Haven’t had much time to cruise the web this week + a pain in the back is keeping me from to much typing. Fortunately the daily mail brings its load of jokes, “cool stuff” and other “friendly spams”.

Among the Check this out type subjects was a bunch of pictures of sidewalk chalk art by English artist Julian Beever who is famous in many cities for his amazing 3D illusion art on the pavement. And rightly so, more fun images can be found on his website.

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Alexander Orion: Less is Better

16 January 2007, 17:35

Or, Art Less Pollution.

Nothing like a skull or two or more to bring some life to a soot covered underpass. In São Paulo last July, artist Alexander Orion cover a whole wall with them by simply and selectively washing part of the soot away!

This is a great work: check out the images!

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment

They scan your intimacy to protect your privacy!

15 January 2007, 17:32

The artist Christophe Bruno has a blog Logo.Hallucination that comments on his use of neural network based software to scan image randomly found on the web for hidden logos and certainly asks a valid question: who does our glance belong too? Too bad his example are so straight forward that I have a hard time feeling much excitement with them, still I would think that’s also one of the points being made.

A question comes to mind, does art need to be interesting visually, or just interesting to think about? Obviously a trick question, since the answer can only be: whatever….

Rattlebrained

Art Browsing,

Comment